June 8, 2011

Barabass' Cross

You opened the eyes of those who were blind
I opened the throats of the innocent
Your presence brought healing to broken mankind
My presence brought torturous torment
(I can still hear their screams in my mind)
Now between us the masses pass judgment

Naked before them - the wolf and the lamb
One man they'll deliver, one they will damn
The devil or angel, which will go free?
Which one will writhe on the crucible tree?
Plumb the depths to this sea of insanity
Find the lack of mankind in humanity

My jaws are still wet with the lifeblood I drew
From the hearts of their brothers and friends
So I curse at the crowd and I spit upon you
It's a joke, we both know how this ends
What more proof do they need to pursue?
Kill me now while the madness descends

Their verdict rings out like a clarion bell
Like a kiss from the lips of Lord Judas
The rabble condemns the Anointed to hell
And I know I shall never forget this
For you've taken my place in the furnace
You will die on the cross of Barabbas

5 comments:

kourtney said...

now that there, is some writing! powerful powerful stuff!

k.

Ginny said...

This is an amazing and powerful piece. Have read and heard this story many times, but your words have really brought it to life in this poem.
Especially like the vividness of Stanzas 2 an 4:
'Naked before them-the wolf and the lamb
One man they'll deliver, one they will damn'
'Which one will writhe on the crucible tree'
'Their verdict rings like a clarion bell
Like a kiss from the lips of Lord Judas
The rabble condemns the Anointed to hell'
Wow!! Truly inspired words, Mark!

Mark Zellner said...

Thanks, you've got some pretty powerful stuffy yourself, Kourtney!

I appreciate you taking the time to point out your favorite parts, Ginny. Always a pleasure hearing from you.

Reformed rebel said...

This poem brings out so many things. One man they'll deliver, and one they will damn...wow!
Great piece
Blessings in Christ
Chelle

Mark Zellner said...

Thank you Chelle. This piece was really challenging to write, because I was looking at the crucifixion from the eyes of a condemned criminal.